CENTRE PAGE FEATURES 
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WHAT IS IT?
Churches Count on Nature, to run between 5-13 June 2021, is a citizen-science event covering churchyards across the England and Wales. 
The project will see communities and visitors making a note of the animals, birds, insects, or fungi in their local churchyard. Their data will then be collated on the National Biodiversity Network.

WHY IS IT SO IMPORTANT?
The ‘State of Nature’ report published in 2019 found that populations of the UK’s most important wildlife have plummeted by an average of 60% since 1970.  In addition, the area inhabited by officially designated “priority species” has shrunk by 27%.
It is thought church land, often uniquely unploughed and undeveloped, could be a habitat for precious and endangered plants and other wildlife.

WHO CAN TAKE PART?
The week is open to anyone with a love of nature and churches are being encouraged to link with local schools, local wildlife groups, and those who may not have visited before to discover churchyards.
For more information about what  is happening in our local churchyards, see the Linton and Upton Bishop pages in the Chimes, or contact your local church.

WHAT MIGHT WE FIND?
These grassland habitats are particularly important for butterflies, wild flowers and insects.  We encourage Chimes readers to write to us and send pictures of what they find!  Happy Hunting!  

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KNIFE ANGEL VISIT TO HEREFORD CATHEDRAL – 14 JUNE TO 12 JULY
The Knife Angel will be situated outside the West End of Hereford Cathedral from 14 June to 12 July.  The sculpture is 27ft tall, it weighs 3.5 ton and is made out of 100,000 confiscated knives received from 43 Police Forces across the UK. It originated from The British Ironwork Centre in Oswestry and took sculptor Alfie Bradley over two years to construct. It has been on tour round the UK and has become a national monument against violence and aggression in all its forms. Not only does the Angel act as a catalyst for turning the tide on violent and aggressive behaviour, but it is also acts as a beautiful memorial designed to celebrate those lives who have been lost through these violent and thoughtless actions.
The team responsible for bringing the Knife Angel to Hereford is headed by Alison Davies and Meryl Cain. Alison lost her son Mark to knife crime in 2018. The team want to raise awareness of the catastrophic impact violent crime has on individuals, families and communities.
Inside both the cathedral and Hereford Library, there will be boards displaying work carried out in response to the Knife Angel by children and young people.  The project team will also share work via social media.  Hereford City Youth Council have also arranged a series of workshop events throughout the month including creative arts and self-defence coaching.

The knife angel creators would like as many young people as possible to become anti-violence champions and have created an anti-violence certificate as a thank you to all young people who stand up to violence.  There will be printed copies of the certificate available at the Knife Angel for those who visit.
For more information please visit the Knife Angel Hereford website: www.knifeangelhereford.co.uk

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