COMBINED VILLAGE NEWS 

FLICKS IN THE STICKS AT GORSLEY VILLAGE HALL

It seems pretty clear we won't be running any Flicks films for the remainder of this year, and probably not for the first couple of months (at least) of 2021. So please let me know of any films you have seen recently that you feel others might also enjoy. I've had one suggestion since last month: '1917'. I saw this when it came out last year and had it as a possible for Flicks before Covid arrived. Very different from your average war film, give it a go if you haven't already seen it, you won't be disappointed.
Take care and stay safe. 

Tony Beckwith

CHILDREN’S SOCIETY BOX HOLDERS

Roger Barnes reports: “Once again you have achieved a great result and raised £508.40 for the Society. Its work has assumed an even greater  importance in 2020 when Coronavirus has put people, including the young, under greater pressure and stress. Countrywide, in 2019 box holders raised £1.4 million and, in this country, directly helped more than 11,000 children find hope for the future. Issues dealt with include abuse, homelessness, drug addiction and mental illness. In addition, campaigning made life better for more than 400,000 people. Thank you for caring.”
 

Linton & District History Society

We regret to announce that all of our planned meetings for the remainder of this year have been cancelled.  
Subject to a significant improvement in the present Covid 19 situation by February our next meeting will be on the 3rd February, 2021. The Society is probably the only Herefordshire History Society to look beyond the immediate locality and approximately two thirds of our talks concern National and/or International events.  See our articles at on our Historical blog page

For more information see our web site http://www.ldhs.net or contact Dorian Osborne click here to contact.


CSA SCHEME 

CALL FOR INTEREST: DO YOU WANT VEGETABLES, MEAT AND FLOWERS GROWN LOCALLY DELIVERED LOCALLY FROM A COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE SCHEME?

Close your eyes and imagine the smell of a freshly picked tomato, hear the snap of the first pea pod, the taste of the tiniest broad bean, the fragrance of basil, mint, thyme, coriander; brushing past a blackcurrant bush, tugging out a leek in autumn before the heavens open, and washing the frost-nipped parsnips ready for a roast dinner. And imagine if the vegetables, fruit and even the roast, came from just down the road, and without you, it wouldn’t have grown.
Of course, not everyone has either had the chance to learn what these vegetable and fruit encounters are like, or how they got there or even how to grow them. It might be because of lack of time, know-how, physical ability or space. 

One of the many things the Covid pandemic highlighted very early on, was the fragility of our food supply. Here at Tan House farm, our meat was swiftly sold out and our eggs were sold sooner than our hens could lay them! In the UK alone, the interest in local and farm-direct vegetable and meat box schemes has sky-rocketed.
So, what is Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)? 
It’s a partnership between a farmer and people in the community, in which the responsibilities, risks and rewards of a farming enterprise are shared. The farmer receives a more stable and secure income and closer connection with their community, and people benefit by eating fresh healthy local food, feeling more connected to the land where their food is grown and can often learn or transfer new skills.

CSA members’ support goes beyond a straight-forward marketplace exchange of money for goods and may be through ownership or investment in the farm or business, sharing the costs of production, accepting a share in the harvest or providing occasional labour.The most common produce for CSA farms is vegetables, but they can also include eggs, poultry, bread, fruit, pork, lamb, beef and dairy produce. 
A CSA helps to address increasing concerns about the lack of transparency, sustainability and resilience of our food system. It is one of the most radical ways that we can re-take control and ownership of our food system.
As the farmers at Tan House Farm, we’re keen to make it happen to contribute quality food to our community and set up a vegetable and fruit growing CSA. If you’re interested, curious or ready to roll, email me Kate click here to contact.or call me on click here to contact. No questions, curiosity or commitment too small or too big! This is just exploration for now but hoping that together we can make it happen in our community.

IS THIS YOUR ROLE?

Is this what you do? Do you look after someone of any age caring or supporting them, as an unpaid family member or friend who, due to their illness, disability, mental health problem or an addiction, cannot cope without your support?  If so you are a Carer, but maybe don’t recognise yourself as such because you feel it a natural duty to undertake this role. That’s fine, but also out there are free organisations who you can call for advice or a chat if the going gets tough. 

Did you know that 1 in 12 young people are carers often caring for a sibling or parent?

You may not have the time to do all the things you would usually do for yourself and this can have an impact on both your physical and emotional well-being. Quite often, the needs of the person you care for will come before your own and without realising you neglect your own needs, which can lead to ill health or increased stress.

Crossroads Together are available to support your need, when you need it, with some practical help or a break from your caring responsibilities.  They understand that being a carer can be lonely at times and lead to feelings of isolation. The current Covid-19 pandemic has really highlighted how such isolation can affect a carer’s mental well-being, particularly during lockdown/shielding where many carers have gone for months without seeing anyone other than the person they care for.

This organisation has Carer-Links teams, (https://www.crossroadstogether.org.uk/our-services/carerlinks/) which can keep in touch with the carers and support, or offer many digital ways to communicate with others through their virtual groups. However, sometimes you just want to take some time out to write a letter or email to someone who understands first-hand what you are going through.

This is why they’ve created the Carers Pen Pal Scheme. To complete their form to join, check out this link: https://www.crossroadstogether.org.uk/carers-pen-pal-scheme/

Once on the website you will full details of their other services which I have recently used to gain advice for a Young Carer in Lea, and their family.

 

Sylvie Nicholls

Copy deadline for December edition - Saturday 7th November